Category Archives: Poetry

Easter, 1916

Easter, 1916

By William Butler Yeats 1865–1939

I have met them at close of day
Coming with vivid faces
From counter or desk among grey
Eighteenth-century houses.
I have passed with a nod of the head
Or polite meaningless words,
Or have lingered awhile and said
Polite meaningless words,
And thought before I had done
Of a mocking tale or a gibe
To please a companion
Around the fire at the club,
Being certain that they and I
But lived where motley is worn:
All changed, changed utterly:
A terrible beauty is born.

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Black Power Dialectics (HUM415)

Note that this clip is prefaced with a commercial. Does that mean consumer capitalism has won? That it contains the seeds of its own destruction?

In any case, consider these words:

The course of revolution is 360 degrees.

Understand the cycle that never ends.

Understand the beginning to be the end and nothing

in between but space and time that I make or you make

to relate or not to relate to the world outside my mind, your mind.

Speak not of revolution until you are willing to eat rats to survive.

What can you do with these lyrics?

Dialectics in Exile

The village of Hollywood was planned according to the


People in these parts have of heaven. In these parts

They have come to the conclusion that God

Requiring a heaven and a hell, didn’t need to

Plan two establishments but

Just the one: heaven. It

Serves the unprosperous, unsuccessful

As hell.

— Bertolt Brecht, “Hollywood Elegies”

Amiri Baraka (1934-2014)

Poet, playwright, provocateur, Black Power radical, Marxist-Leninist, founding member of the Black Arts Movement: Amiri Baraka exemplified the restless energy of a generation who came of age at the high point of a kind of postwar urban negritude. Impatient, inflammatory, intelligent, and indignant– impossible to commodify– Baraka never backed down.