Monthly Archives: September 2014

Network

From the 1976 film:

		JENSEN
	You have meddled with the primal
	forces of nature, Mr. Beale, and I
	won't have it, is that clear?!  You
	think you have merely stopped a
	business deal -- that is not the
	case!  The Arabs have taken billions
	of dollars out of this country, and
	now they must put it back.  It is
	ebb and flow, tidal gravity, it is
	ecological balance!  You are an old
	man who thinks in terms of nations
	and peoples.  There are no nations!
	There are no peoples!  There are no
	Russians.  There are no Arabs!
	There are no third worlds!  There is
	no West!  There is only one holistic
	system of systems, one vast and
	immane, interwoven, interacting,
	multi-variate, multi-national
	dominion of dollars! petro-dollars,
	electro-dollars, multi-dollars!,
	Reichmarks, rubles, rin, pounds and
	shekels!  It is the international
	system of currency that determines
	the totality of life on this planet!
	That is the natural order of things
	today!  That is the atomic,
	subatomic and galactic structure of
	things today!  And you have meddled
	with the primal forces of nature,
	and you will atone!  Am I getting
	through to you, Mr. Beale?
		(pause)

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Long Take/ Following Shot (HUM303)

From True Detective. Begins at the 4 sec mark.

From the Yale Film Analysis Guide, which you should be consulting by now:

Unless shot at a fixed angle, with a fixed camera and no movement, long takes are extremely hard to shoot. They have to be choreographed and rehearsed to the last detail, since any error would make it necessary to start all over again from scratch. Sophisticated long takes such as this one from The Player, which includes all kinds of camera movements and zooms, are often seen as auteuristic marks of virtuosity. Aside from the challenge of shooting in real time, long takes decisively influence a film’s rhythm. Depending on how much movement is included, a long take can make a film tense, stagnant and spell-binding, or daring, flowing and carefree.Indeed, directors like Altman, Welles, Renoir, Angelopoulos, Tarkovski or Mizoguchi have made long takes (usually in combination with deep focus and deep space) an essential part of their film styles.