analepsis

“So as to give them courage we must teach people to be shocked by themselves.”

Douchebag: Non-required Reading

This article by Michael Mark Cohen has been getting some attention. See what you think:

Douchebag: The White Racial Slur We’ve All Been Waiting For

Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari Restored! (HUM303/ HUM425)

This beautiful restored cut of Dr. Caligari’s Cabinet was uploaded recently. We’re going to be watching from the 55 min. mark to about 1:06 on Tuesday.

Syllabus Revisions (HUM303/ HUM415/ HUM425)

The class schedule has been revised. Please make a note of the changes.

Adaptation (HUM303/ HUM425)

What happens when a Romanian dance company adapts The Trial and apparently sets it to a techno beat?

What happens when a City of Bath College drama troupe stages a play based on The Trial in the street and shoots it in a single take?

 

 

 

Bureaucracy (HUM303/ HUM425)

There’s something of Kafka in Terry Gilliam’s 1985 film Brazil. Note the mise en scene.

Mids

HUM425 Thought and Image FALL 14 Midterm

Identify and explain the significance of ONLY 5 of the following prompts. When possible, establish links between the prompts and larger ideas addressed in the course thus far.

Remember: your goal is to demonstrate 1) knowledge of the various texts we have read/screened and 2) your ability to think synthetically.

  1. entartete kunst
  2. “Publicity turns consumption into a substitute for democracy.”
  3. d-o-g
  4. iconic
  5. Italianicity
  6. interpellation
  7. the myth of photographic truth
  8. see image

 

HUM415 Contemporary Culture FALL 14 Midterm

Identify and explain the significance of ONLY 5 of the following prompts. When possible, establish links between the prompts and larger ideas addressed in the course thus far.

Remember: your goal is to demonstrate 1) knowledge of the various texts we have read/screened and 2) your ability to think synthetically.

  1. “I’m a Badman….”
  2. exchange value
  3. interpenetration of opposites
  4. embedded liberalism
  5. aegyo
  6. “All that is solid melts into air….”
  7. “Looking at the broader picture, we detect similar tendencies: in consumer and celebrity cultures, the drive for instant gratification, the fantasies of success, the fetishisation of technology, the triumph of ‘life-style’ over substance, the endless refashioning of the ‘self’, the commercialization of ‘identity’ and the utopias of self-sufficiency. These ‘soft’ forms of power are as effective in changing social attitudes as are ‘hard’ forms of power such as legislation to restrict strikes.”
  8. practical fetishism

 

HUM303 Cultural Periods and Styles FALL 14 Midterm

Identify and explain the significance of ONLY 5 of the following prompts. When possible, establish links between the prompts and larger ideas addressed in the course thus far.

Remember: your goal is to demonstrate 1) knowledge of the various texts we have read/screened and 2) your ability to think synthetically.

  1. proairetic code
  2. constituent event
  3. “It is the form which seeks to merge itself so thoroughly with the world that its status as art is suppressed. It is as though its representations have become so transparent that we stare straight through them to reality itself. The ultimate representation, so it seems, would be one which was identical with what it represented. But then, ironically, it would no longer be a representation at all.”
  4. whodunit
  5. contrapuntal reading
  6. Lascar
  7. mise en scene
  8. discourse
  9. “’It is one of those instances where the reasoner can produce an effect which seems remarkable to his neighbor, because the latter has missed the one little point which is the basis of the deduction. The same may be said, my dear fellow, for the effect of some of these little sketches of yours, which is entirely meretricious, depending as it does upon your retaining in your own hands some factors in the problem which are never imparted to the reader.”

 

Fragment (HUM303)

Begin with a commonplace: crime fiction is often a vehicle for social criticism (The Goodbye Kiss, the novels of David Peace, Dashiel Hammett, etc.). Just as often, perhaps, the genre serves as a means of conserving the status quo (Christie, Spillane, the “policier” as a genre). In both cases the rules of society are transgressed and defended according to a narrative of equilibrium’s rupture and restoration. But what if we invert Todorov’s basic template and consider fictions that dramatize the re-instantiation of social dis-equilibrium? In this scenario, the ‘crime’ is a restoration– that which produces a situation of justice. The capture of the criminal, her punishment, and the crime’s restitution signal the true rupture– a return to the prevailing (dis)order of the social formation (“society”).

For example, the political criminal who acts to subvert or destroy an inegalitarian systym is punished in order to shore up hierarchy. We can see this at work in many cases, from the ‘social bandits’ of the Great Depression (“Pretty Boy Floyd” by Woody Guthrie, the 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde) to the petroleuses of the Paris Commune (a historical event judged a criminal conspiracy by the international press). The crime itself indicates not a lapse in democratic practice but an effort to realize it, represents a situation in which social norms are upended and thus attain their truth. “Crimes” that interrupt reification, undermine colonial rule, and level social distinctions are in fact acts of justice….

 

 

 

 

Still the Enemy Within

This looks good. A documentary about the Miner’s Strike in the UK, the suppression of which  inaugurated Thatcherism:

 

“We must stop being afraid of words” (HUM415)

Der Proceß (HUM303/ HUM425)

MOMA_310013

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